You Don’t Need to be a Virgin or a Whore

You Don’t Need to be a Virgin or a Whore

Mary Magdalene Was Not a Whore! Dear Love Tribe,

You don’t need to be a virgin or a whore?

Now this is fascinating. Working in the business of understanding sexuality relationships, love and fidelity, my research has led me to many people who have investigated the original myths and religious documents that helped build our societies. Religious moral compasses have often led to great growth for humanity as well as deep shame.

The long standing social construct of the Madonna and the Whore, a man needing both, desiring one and then the other, was created in many ways by the very early story telling of Mary Magdalene (the whore Jesus saved) and the Virgin Mary (the infallible pure mother of his birth). I am personally fascinated by the way this plays out in relationships and self worth situations in our world today.

As a Catholic, and a spiritually committed person bent on improving love for all, I wrestle with the way that religion has adversely affected our experience with sex, love and intimacy. I want to help bring light to the honest truth of sex as opposed to the shady darkness of deception.

I am thrilled that the leaders of the Catholic church are readying to divest themselves of the myth of the whore and instead welcome the possibility that she was in fact his wife, his partner, and not just a leg spreading villain saved by his holy grace. Women do not have to be one or the other. This makes it easier for me to do my job as both a Catholic and a love entrepreneur.

Love,
Summers McKay

Post inspired by Venus Matters on Facebook – Original Post

www.facebook.com/venusmatters

Last Sunday, Pope Francis elevated the day long set aside for a memorial to Mary Magdalene into a feast day. This basically lifts her to the level of the apostles—and it’s a big deal in the Catholic Church, and indeed for the Western world. The Eastern Orthodox Church has long given Mary Magdalene a higher stature. There, she was never equated with the prostitute or the woman Jesus cast demons outof—correctly separating her from other female figures that appear in the gospels. But this important upgrade by the pope opens a door for a much-needed reframe of Mary Magdalene in the West.

In an article for the Vatican newspaper, Archbishop Arthur Roche wrote that St. Mary Magdalene’s new feast day is a call for all Christians to “reflect more deeply on the dignity of women, the new evangelization and the greatness of the mystery of divine mercy.”

It’s about time. And in fact, there are indications that Mary was actually the wife of Jesus but the early Church, as it canonized the four gospels and an all-male priesthood, eventually requiring priests to be celibate, further and further distanced itself from the sanctity of women—and, indeed, from the spiritual potencies of sex itself.

There’s an ancient text which dates from around the same time of the four gospels called the Gospel of Mary. It is a mysterious fragment which ends with Peter questioning the strange things Mary tells the apostles Jesus told her when she saw him first after his resurrection. From the text:

“Then Mary wept and said to Peter, My brother Peter, what do you think? Do you think that I have thought this up myself in my heart, or that I am lying about the Savior?
Levi answered and said to Peter, Peter you have always been hot tempered.
Now I see you contending against the woman like the adversaries.
But if the Savior made her worthy, who are you indeed to reject her? Surely the Savior knows her very well.
That is why He loved her more than us.”

While this significant moment in the Catholic Church was overshadowed by the terrible tragedy that unfolded in Orlando last Sunday there’s a strange synchronicity there too. When we fully honor the feminine and the masculine energies, allowing people of any sex to love whomever they wish—men loving men, women loving women, transgenders loving as they please—we tap a profound power of being human. This is ultimately why sex, homosexuality and women have been so controlled and even seen as evil through the ages. Because when humans tap their own innately divine feminine and masculine powers, we don’t need an intermediary like a priest to get to god (or a bevy of virgins promised to the jihadist martyrs in the afterlife).

So this July 22nd, St. Mary Magdalene’s Feast Day, and every day, let’s feast on the truth of being holy women and men—and anything in between—engaged in deeply nourishing acts of love. Mary Magdalene, thank you for showing us the way…

Painting by Валерий Кот.

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